The Quantified Life: Days 0-60

Authors note: Anything you see in any of my blog posts that is underlined is either a cool external link to help you learn more or internal links to my own related content.

New Project: The Quantified Life

*Note: The Google Sheet link to John’s Quantified Life data can be found HERE.

In my last blog post, I described how I’ve designed my life around a few carefully chosen, interdependent goals. I also described, at a high level, my strategy and tactics for making progress towards those goals.

However, having inspiring goals is worthless if you don’t actually do the day-to-day hard work required to make real progress towards your goals. If last blog post was akin to “talking the talk”, this post is about actually “walking the walk.” After I wrote the True Goals vs Fuel Goals blog post, I realized that merely having goals was NOT going to be enough to ensure success. To continuously improve, I realized that I need constant monitoring and daily, objective feedback.

Legendary management consultant Peter Drucker famously said, “What gets measured, gets improved.” I largely agree with this statement and so, as of October 1, 2018, I have embarked a new project that I’m calling Quantified Life. The goal of Quantified Life is to collect data on my own personal Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) related to my goals, analyze the data, and use the insights to improve my rate of personal growth.

Richard Feynman said “The first principle is that you must not fool yourself — and you are the easiest person to fool.” When it comes to making progress towards your goals, the best way to ensure that you’re not fooling yourself is to have good data on your own progress (or lack of progress). Knowledge really is power in this case, and today’s modern technology - namely smartphones and wearables - make collecting and analyzing your personal data something that anyone can do.

The Quantified Self movement

This project was directly inspired by the Quantified Self movement. You can think of Quantified Self as the marriage between personal data and self-improvement. Here’s the description from the Quantified Self Wiki page:

“Quantified self, also known as lifelogging, is a specific movement by Gary Wolf and Kevin Kelly from Wired magazine, which began in 2007 and tries to incorporate technology into data acquisition on aspects of a person's daily life. People collect data in terms of food consumed, quality of surrounding air, mood, skin conductance as a proxy for arousal, pulse oximetry for blood oxygen level, and performance, whether mental or physical. Wolf has described quantified self as "self-knowledge through self-tracking with technology".[1]

My first step in this new project was to convert my goals into measurable data points and start tracking them daily. Below is a diagram from my last blog post that I created to visualize my goals. These are the essential goals/tasks that I’m trying to convert to measurable data points for this Quantified Life project.

goal2.PNG

Here are some apps I’m using to collect/track this data: Fitbit, MyFitnessPal, Goodreads, Insight Timer, and Google Sheets.

The Key Metrics

What makes this project particularly interesting to me is trying to come up with ways to quantify goals that don’t typically lend themselves to easy quantification, especially personal relationships. As of right now, I’m currently tracking myself on over 30 metrics. This was my first attempt at converting my goals to quantifiable metrics and I’m certain that these goals will need to be tweaked over time. Most of the health goals are based on common health indicators and most of the non-health metrics are frequency-based. Below is a break down of many of those key metrics by goal type:

Great relationships

-Fatherhood: spend at least 60 minutes/day bonding/playing with our new baby boy

-Marriage: Have monthly date nights with my wife and do surprise “extra” chores (that she typically does) for my wife twice per week

-Son: Visit my parents every 2 weeks, on average

-Brother: Do 3 “sibling-only” meals per year with my brother and sister. No kids, spouses, or parents allowed.

-Others: Do 1 random act of kindness per week

-Network: Add 1 new, quality relationship to my network every month.

-Also, I am currently experimenting with 3 different personal CRM apps (Ryze, Cultivate, and Garden) which set up automatic, customized reminders for me to keep in touch (texting, calling, or in-person) with my family, friends, and other people in my network. Cultivate seems to be the best one so far.

Improving the World

-Donate annually to Effective Altruism-type charities. Currently, I am partial to de-worming and anti-malarial charities: Deworm the World, Schistosomiasis Control Initiative, and the Against Malaria foundation.

-Keep up with news/debates within the Effective Altruism community via the EA Facebook Group and EA community forums. (Not currently tracked)

Skills/Knowledge/Platform

-Read a book per week, on average.

-Release 1 podcast episode per month

-Publish 1 blog post per quarter

Wealth

-Maintain a specific personal savings rate %. (The rate itself is private, but I will include this as a monthly pass/fail goal as part of my Quantified Life)

-Achieve longer term salary/cash flow, investing returns, and net worth goals. (Private, and tracked outside of this project)

Physical & Mental Health

-Drink 1 gallon of water per day

-Meditate daily, for at least 10 minutes per day

-Do my 5 minute Journal daily

-Lose 40-50 ish pounds to achieve goal weight of 150lb

-Track a variety of diet metrics (net calories, net carbs, sugar, etc)

-Track running and fitness metrics (running, push ups, pull ups, etc)

-Track steps, heart rate, and blood pressure

Going Public With My Data

Am I crazy for making this data public? Maybe, but I actually don’t think so. All things considered, these data points I’m making public are pretty benign. I’m confident that the added benefits of making my commitment to improving these metrics public and of sharing that journey with all of you outweigh the risks of personal harm from making this data public. So, here you go internet…my Quantified Life database for the first 60 days. Enjoy!

Early Observations and Takeaways

After 60 days of tracking, here are some things I’ve learned:

sleep snip.PNG
goal weight.PNG
  1. Doing extra chores, meeting new people, and doing random acts of kindness are WAY harder than spending quality time with my family and friends. It’s not exactly surprising that I unperformed on those goals because I thoroughly enjoy spending quality time with my family & friends, but I find chores and meeting new peoples deeply unpleasant. However, it was nice to see the data confirm this weakness of mine. I will have to double down on my efforts on these particular goals.

  2. I was surprised how much sleep I’m actually getting with an infant to take care of (6.5 hours on avg). This probably means either our son is sleeping pretty well, or possibly that I’m not exactly doing my fair share of late-night baby duty.

  3. Although I’ve been very inconsistent on my diet, it was nice to see that I did lose about 7 pounds or so during the first 60 days. However, almost all of that weight loss occurred in the first few weeks, and I haven’t lost any weight in the past month or so. That is a trend I must break.

  4. My daily ritual of inputting new data points every morning and watching the graphs update really has a gamification effect that makes me much more motivated to keep striving than I otherwise would.

Goddart’s Law

One important concept that I’m a bit weary of is Goddart’s Law:

"When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure." “Any observed statistical regularity will tend to collapse once pressure is placed upon it for control purposes”

While it is certainly true that linking rewards/punishments to any metric increases the risk of unintended consequences resulting from the incentive to meet that goal, I think the benefits of self-monitoring outweigh those concerns. I’ll have to be careful that I don’t cheat my own incentive system!

Future Updates

I plan on releasing an updated version of this data every 3 months or so and sharing whatever insights I gain through this blog. I expect this will be a fun project, that will reveal my own strengths and weaknesses, and help me on the path towards self-mastery.

“If you can master yourself, you will find yourself in control of a great empire.” - Publius Syrus

Thanks for reading,

John


Buddhism vs Stoicism: Two Surprisingly Similar Philosophies

Despite arising independently in two very different places and times. Buddhism (founded in ancient India in the 4th-6th centuries BCE) and Stoicism (developed in Rome and Greece in the between the 3rd century BCE and 3rd century CE ) have some very similar core tenets and practices. 

I created an original info-graphic (my first ever) to summarize some of these key similarities. I am a big fan of these two philosophies and try to utilize them as much as I can in my own life. 

For books on Buddhism I recommend either the actual (challenging) ancient texts or, if you're looking for something easier to digest, Seeing Yourself As You Really Are by Dalai Lama XIV . For more on Stoicism I recommend The Obstacle is the Way by Ryan Holiday and Meditations by Marcus Aurelius. I have tried three different meditation apps (Insight Timer, Simple Habit, and 10% Happier) and rank them in that order with Insight Timer being by far my favorite. Thanks to my good friend Dr. Liz Rosenthal for turning me on to Insight Timer.